Sleep

Whether you have been diagnosed with Insomnia or just want better sleep, neurofeedback brain training can be used to help regulate your circadian ryhthms. Since your brain regulates powerful hormones like adrenaline and cortisol, which control your sleep cycle, our program helps retrain those regulatory patterns.

A sampling of recent studies on neurofeedback for sleep disorders

The Treatment of Psychophysiologic Insomnia with Biofeedback: A Replication Study [abs.]
by Hauri PJ, Percy L, Hellekson C, Hartmann E, Russ D

ABSTRACT
To replicate a previous study, 16 psychophysiological insomniacs were randomly assigned to either Theta feedback or sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) feedback.

EEG Slow (~1 Hz) Waves Are Associated With Nonstationarity of Thalamo-Cortical Sensory Processing in the Sleeping Human
by Massimini M, Rosanova M, Mariotti M

ABSTRACT
Intracellular studies reveal that, during slow wave sleep (SWS), the entire cortical network can swing rhythmically between extremely different microstates, ranging from wakefulness-like network activation to functional disconnection in the space of a few hundred milliseconds.

Sleep Cyclic Alternating Pattern in Normal School-Age Children [abs.]
by Bruni O, Ferri R, Miano S, Verrillo E, Vittori E, Della Marca G, Farina B, Mennuni G

ABSTRACT
CAP parameters were quantified in 10 normal healthy subjects (6 males and 4 females, mean age 8.3 years; range 6-10 years). All subjects underwent polysomnography recordings for two consecutive nights in a standard laboratory setting. Sleep data were stored on computer using a 16-channel polysomnography digital system. Sleep macrostructure was visually scored according to the criteria by Rechtschaffen and Kales (Brain Information Service/Brain Research Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, 1968); CAP was visually scored following the criteria by Terzano et al. (Sleep Med 2 (2001) 537).

DC-EEG Discloses Prominent, Very Slow Activity Patterns During Sleep in Preterm Infants [abs.]
by Vanhatalo S, Tallgren P, Andersson S, Sainio K, Voipio J, Kaila K

ABSTRACT
The objective of this study is to test the hypothesis that the immature human brain exhibits slow electrical activity that is not detected by conventional (i.e. high-pass filtered) electroencephalography (EEG).

For more information please visit…

ISNR

The International Society for Neuronal Regulation and Research        a well maintained bibliography of neurofeedback research

EEGInfo

A well organized page on the major studies on neurofeedback and its applications.